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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
. that was our religion to a certain extent. >> that was your religion. >> yeah. so now suddenly i had different interests and was moving in another direction. not that there was a falling out or they were mean to me or anything, just we started being interested in different things. >> as you went public with your beliefs, what was the reaction of your family? >> they were not very happy about it. i come from a very intellectual family, very liberal family that's, you know, my parents are professors, and they thought it was extremely odd and didn't like it very much. i remember tell mig mother i'm going to a bible study and she said, okay, and then she said, well, that's good, that's a nice education, you know, for literature and things like that. and i said, no, i believe it. and she sort of said, okay. >> the reactions to your piece and whether it surprised you. >> very positive. yeah, i was surprised. i got so many e-mails. i even heard from some of my friends who are atheists who were interested in it and appreciated it and were inspired by it. so, yeah, i was really welcome and a nice respo
where they are from, no matter their race or religion, nelson mandela's name will be among them. >> nelson mandela did not pretend to be a saint and the coverage has taken note of some of his mistakes but and he was symbol, a courageous are moral leader, the coverage can barely convey. >> everyone prize themselves on scoring points for one side or another. it was nice to see a story for once where the "new york post," "new york times," mother jones everyone was in agreement that we lost a great man. that was refreshing. >> there's been a little bit of point scoring. "huffington post" put up how right let nelson mandela down. but there does seem to be an absence of cynicism and everybody feeling like we have witnessed the passing of a guy who spent 27 years in prison and came out to be a tremendous leader. >> can i just say, even on twitter, i think we're not used -- we forgot about the time when there was no snark and have a conversation and say he was a great person. it was interesting to see some of the old coverage dusted off, like this weekend interview with dick cheney he s
, their religion, nelson mandela's name will be among them. >> he did not pretend to be 10 saint. coverage has taken note mistakes but he was such a courageous moral leader and a symbol the coverage can barely convey his legacy. what struck you most about the continuing coverage leading up to this? >> it was refreshing we live in an age where everyone prides himself on scoring points for one side or another and the media is increasingly partisan and polarized and it was nice to see a story where new york post and "new york times" and mother jones believed the world left one of the greatest men ever. >> this is legitimate debate about apartheid in the 80's but there is an absence of cynicism and snarking and everyone feeling like we have witnessed the passing of a guy who spent 27 years in prison and came out to be a tremendous leader. >> even on twitter, we are not used to us, we have forgotten when there was no snark and quote have a conversation and say we are sad, he was great person and it was refreshing to see that. not just the old coverage dusted off like the interview with dick cheney
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)